rebuilding our community

Montrio Belton for SC Supt of Education

Django Unchained | meet the press (2013) Quentin Tarantino

Please share your thoughts...

To teachers and students everywhere

Game time Pep talk

Middle School Project uses Civil War theme

This video is the product for a middle school Civil War project in March 21, 2013. The video footage was taken about a year earlier at a Civil War Re-enactment at The White Homestead in Fort Mill, SC.

The new ETV PBS LearningMedia

South Carolina ETV Offers New Digital Content to Local Schools

Enhanced PBS Content Library Aligned to SC State Standards, New User and Analytics Tools Help SC Educators Effectively Manage the Use of Digital Media in Classrooms

For Immediate Release
October 10, 2013

As the demand for technology in the classroom continues to rise, ETV announces a new PBS premium service available free for one year to all SC public, private and home schools. The new ETV PBS LearningMedia includes enhanced features and more than 800 hours of additional digital content drawn from PBS programming such as Ken Burns' CIVIL WAR, NOVA, FRONTLINE, and an array of PBS KIDS programs that further deepen educator and student engagement with digital media.

Emmy and Peabody winner South Carolina ETV, which has been teaching with technology since 1958, continues to be at the forefront of electronic educational media. “We’ve been comfortable with non-paper educational material for over half a century, and were the first South Carolina station to go digital, so the foundation has already been laid,” said Dean Byrd, head of ETV’s Education Division. “We’re pleased to offer these quality PBS resources to schools on-demand, and will add to the 5800 teachers trained this last year in our face-to-face digital media workshops.”

We have come a long way America!

Robert Smalls: From Slavery to US Congress, the life of an extraordinary South Carolinian

SCETV

Robert Smalls was inducted into the South Carolina Hall of Fame on Feb. 9th. 2010.
Description: Scholars, an author, family descendants, and independent filmmaker join others to examine the historic life of Robert Smalls. His rise from slavery, to the US Congress, along, with excerpts from a film on his life highlight the conversation.

ETV – 01/17 @7:30pm
ETV - 01/20 @12:00pm
ETV World 01/20 @4:00pm
ETV World 01/22 @5:00pm
SCC - 01/24 @ 8:30pm

Absent Fathers’ Contribution to Juvenile Delinquency

By: Evaney Nesbitt

Juvenile delinquency can be linked to several different reasons. Fatherlessness is the most harmful demographic trend of this generation. It’s the fuel that drives our most urgent social problems from crime to adolescent pregnancy to domestic violence against women. Fatherlessness is the leading cause of declining child well being in our society. It has been said that the presence of a strong male figure in a household can steer a juvenile down the path of positivity. On the other hand, a juvenile that grows up without a strong positive father figure in the household can also become anything he or she wants to be (President Barack Obama) if they have the will and the determination. The world is filled with productive citizens who were raised in a single female parented home. When compared with mothers, fathers continue to be dramatically, underrepresented in developmental research on psychopathology. Juvenile detention centers also house several juveniles whom have never met the father. So is there a strong link between absent fathers and juvenile delinquency? We know that children who grow up with absent fathers can suffer long lasting damages. Absent fathers can be linked to crime, delinquency, and premature sexuality. The possibility of aggressive or antisocial behavior has been linked to juveniles of incarcerated fathers. Are juveniles who grow up without a father or a father figure more susceptible to a life of crime? The core question is simple, “Do every child need a father”?

Amazing artistry

HOPE in Paradise..and the Red Door

We use the word HOPE in many ways in our everyday conversation. Anywhere from "I hope I can get through the day" to "I hope I don't get caught". But do we really understand the TRUE meaning of the word HOPE? Have you ever actually seen what HOPE looks like? Until recently, I don't believe I have actually grasped what HOPE means, nor what it looks like.
For quite some time I have been compelled to pray for our community. Lifting us up to God that He lead us to the needs of this small town that has burst with growth over the past few years. New business's, widened roads, schools popping up everywhere. People moving in from the North, Mid-west and Eastcoast. So much busyness coming from what used to be a sleepy little town.
Then there's Paradise- the oldest community in Fort Mill, and what seems to be the forgotten community from many. And many who are not even aware of it's existence.
I have been a part of a serving meals ministry for about a year now. This ministry(made up of several church's) has been serving Paradise for five years, with food and prayer mainly, but other needs as they arise. They serve another low income community on the other side of town as well. But Paradise was laid on my heart to serve, little did I know what God had planned. Through His lead I eventually gathered a group of Serving Hearts from my church to serve Paradise.

ETVW's FRONTLINE presents "DROPOUT NATION"

What does it take to save a student? Every year, hundreds of thousands of teenagers in the United States quit high school without diplomas -- an epidemic so out of control that nobody knows the exact number. What is clear is that massive dropout rates cripple individual career prospects and cloud the country's future. At Houston's Sharpstown High, once a notorious "dropout factory," a high-stakes experiment is under way to rescue students from the edge. FRONTLINE spent a semester immersed in Sharpstown to produce a portrait of four students in crisis and the teachers, counselors and principal waging a daily, personal struggle to get them to graduation. A troubling and inspiring journey through the maze of an inner-city high school, "Dropout Nation" investigates the causes, challenges and potential solutions of a national emergency.

Airs Wednesday, September 26, 2012
12:00am - 02:00am
04:00am - 06:00am

"The Road to Paradise" documentary

Fort Mill, SC

The documentary film “The Road to Paradise” 'A quest for enlightenment' is an inspiring portrait of the rich cultural history of the rural American south. The film is based on historical accounts of the origins of a small Black community passionately known as Paradise. This story follows six generations of Black citizens starting with emancipated slaves and ends with public school desegregation of the 1960's. It explores the much forgotten contributions of former slaves and their quest for knowledge. It also examines the social, economic and political challenges each generation faced during this 100 year period.

This project is an incredible opportunity to commemorate the end of the Civil War and emancipation and highlights various aspects of a community’s quest to assimilate during this turbulent period.

This project has many moving parts. Currently, we are focused on conducting interviews and establishing the basic storyline. The camera and audio equipment issues are working out great and plans are on the way to create a screenplay/re-enactment of daily life in this small southern town.

I want to thank those of you who have contributed to the making of this film and hope that you will continue to support me in this important work.

Our mailing address is:
ParadiseWeb Productions
7219 Cascading Pines Dr.
Tega Cay, SC 29708

My email address is: kdixonsr@paradiseweb.org

Thanks again,
Ken Dixon, Sr.

ETV to Air Freedom Riders on May 16 at 9 p.m.

Broadcast Marks 50th Anniversary of Original Freedom Rides.

"Congressman John Lewis, one of the original Riders, who bore the brunt of the first act of violence in the Freedom Rides when he was beaten in Rock Hill, SC."

Columbia, SC… Would you sign your last will and testament before boarding a bus? Some members of the 1961 Freedom Rides did, knowing how close they might come to needing them.

From May until November of that year, more than 400 black and white Americans risked their lives—and many endured savage beatings and imprisonment—for simply traveling together on buses and trains as they journeyed through the Deep South. Deliberately violating Jim Crow laws, the Freedom Riders’ belief in non-violent activism was sorely tested as mob violence and bitter racism greeted them along the way.

On the 50th anniversary of the rides, PBS’ American Experience presents Freedom Riders, a new film featuring testimony from a fascinating cast of central characters: the Riders themselves, state and federal government officials, and journalists who witnessed the rides firsthand. Produced, written and directed by award-winning filmmaker Stanley Nelson, Freedom Riders premieres on South Carolina ETV on Monday, May 16 at 9 p.m.

Downtown monument honors slaves

By Ken Dixon Sr. - kdixonsr@paradiseweb.org
FORT MILL --

Did you know there is a monument in Fort Mill dedicated to slaves? Erected in 1895, this marble stone 15-foot monument is located on the southern side of Confederate Park.
The men listed on the monument, and others like them, took care of the families and properties of soldiers during the Civil War. They were also very instrumental in bringing this town back to life during Reconstruction.
The man credited for erecting the monument, Samuel Elliot White, recognized the role slaves played in maintaining the farms and assisting the families in the Confederate soldiers’ absence. Therefore, he decided to erect the monument to show his appreciation. He was a man of honor and an old soldier himself. He acted out of selflessness. Perhaps the “togetherness of community spirit” that exists in the black community of Paradise was born out of this period of hopelessness and despair.

This monument was the first of its kind in the American South and stands as a testimony of the contributions and sacrifices made by former slaves of the Confederacy. The idea of immortalizing slaves in the form of a monument was inconsistent with the prevailing attitudes towards “Negroes” during the time period. Likewise, and possibly, a more important question comes to mind –why would slaves support a cause that did not guarantee their freedom? The mere notion of a monument to slaves in a southern region known for its racist practices beckons an examination of the relationships between slaves and slave holders.